Dividuality

Spaces

   of

of

Spaces

Dividuality

Economy

of Architecture

Architecture of Economy

Migration of Forms

Forms of Migration

Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality examines urban case studies with prototypical extreme examples of spatial typologies, which are symptomatic of an increasingly “dividual” form of today’s subjectivity. Dividual spaces introduce a fundamental transformation of established spatial concepts. The divided and divisible space corresponds to the “prosumer” subjects and their multiple roles, which always seem to be algorithmically pre-determined from the outset.

halfway in Winter 2018

more about Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality

Screening and Talk with Manu Luksch and Marie-France Rafael: Algorithmic Territories

Screening and Performance with Marie-France Rafael and Romain Gandolphe: Imaginary Display(s)

Map by Benjamin Gerdes and Christian Frieß: User Environments in the Interface City

Prop-Talk 1 with Roman Seidl and Felix Stalder

Archive Box 2, 3, 4 – Material for Prop-Talk 1

Screening and Talk with Helen Knowles: The Trial of Superdebthunterbot

Spatial installation by halfway: You can belong anywhere

Spatial Table (Serial Project 1, 2, 3, 4)

Archive Box 1 – Material for Spatial Table

Spatial Table Talk with Ryo Abe

Spatial Table Talk with Sarah Widmer

Derivatives – Manga Kissa, Spacee

Q&A for Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality

halfway, January 2019, © Wolfgang Thaler

more about Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality

We live in an age of machinic dividualization. […] The reality of today’s dividual data sets, enormous accumulations of data that can be divided, recomposed and valorized in endless ways, is one of worldwide streams, of deterritorialization and of machinic expansion. – Gerald Raunig, 2016 [1]

 

Gigantic databases collect the traces of our movements in (social) networks and calibrate them with consumer-optimized objectives. Hence, the algorithm controls processes which no longer result, like the “market”, in a “process without subject” but in the production of the subject through modulated consumption behaviors. It is a subject that chooses from algorithmically tailored services and products but has lost every form of autonomy. A subject, which is no longer conceived as an individual with an independent cohesive identity, rather as a “dividuum”, which can only be seen as an effect of its division.

 

This first chapter dealt with the problems and potentials of the spatial concentration of human subjectivity. The recent debate about “dividual subjectivity” (cf. Gilles Deleuze, 1997 [2]; Maurizio Lazzarato, 2012 [3]; Gerald Raunig, 2015 [4]) which manifests in “dividual spaces” (Jorge Almazán / Yoshiharu Tsukamoto, 2006 [5])—characterized by temporary and commercial on-demand access, by spatial separation and the “outsourcing” (Stefan Gruber, 2012 [6]) of diverse functions of daily life (manga kissas, Spacee, konbini, share houses, etc.)—can be seen as a problematic expression of an urban archipelago that transcends traditional categories of urban space like private or public, inside and outside. While this phenomenon was researched by a small group of scientists in Tokyo as part of a typical Japanese urban situation, we investigated the transferability of this phenomenon to other local contexts.

 

Dividual spaces form the basis for spaces of dividual subjects, which—since Gilles Deleuze’s incisive text about control societies—represent a type of contemporary antithesis to the individual. As opposed to indivisible individuals, here it is about a conception of a subjectivity that primarily manifests in the mode of dividing—in the different roles we all perform, in daily multitasking, in precarious working conditions, but also in the architecture of dividual spaces: spaces of sharing, but also spaces of division, as they are characteristic of an urban life that increasingly takes place at sites outside of or in the interstitial space between private and public.

 

halfway constructed and discussed these interfaces. We investigated spatial contexts that can potentially turn any space into a dividual space—infrastructures that inform, supply, traverse, and superpose physical space. The spatial setting developed for this purpose was, at the same time, the infrastructure for a discursive architecture, which served as a platform for negotiation, for collecting and spatializing the theses, arguments, symptoms, and speculations. The result was an exemplary semi-urban exhibition environment, configured as a spatial collage consisting of fragments of symptomatic places and spaces. Hence, the display possessed a basic structure that was already highly charged with content. For the actors we invited, this structure was perceived both as a challenge and as an invitation to (spatialized) discourse.

 

Research results, symptomatic case studies, and investigations in progress were presented here. They were placed in a dialogue with artistic projects, which conceived the production of contemporary subjectivity always as a problem of the spatial as well. These projects were either developed site specifically or as a specific curatorial setting as part of the spatialization.

 

[1] Raunig, Gerald. “Dance the Derivative! Some notes on the end of economy, the reinvention of political economy, and Randy Martin’s last book Knowledge LTD.” Translated by Aileen Derieg and Verina Gfader. October 23, 2015. https://non.copyriot.com/tanz-das-derivat-deutschenglisch.

[2] Deleuze, Gilles. Negotiations. Translated by Martin Joughin. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

[3] Lazzarato, Maurizio. The Making of the Indebted Man: An Essay on the Neoliberal Condition. South Pasadena, CA: Semiotext(e), 2012.

[4] Raunig, Gerald: Dividuum. Machinic Capitalism and Molecular Revolution. Translated by Aileen Derieg. South Pasadena, CA: Semiotext(e), 2016.

[5] Almazán Caballero, Jorge, and Yoshiharu Tsukamoto. “Tokyo Public Space Networks at the Intersection of the Commercial and the Domestic Realms.” Study on Dividual Space. JAABE (Journal of Asian Architecture and Building) 5, no. 2 (November 2006).

[6] Gruber, Stefan. “Tokio. Von der Zugangsökonomie zur kollaborativen Stadt.” ARCH+ 208 (2012).

Algorithmic Territories

Film screening and talk: Manu Luksch with Marie-France Rafael

July 18, 2019, halfway

Algorithmic decision making, infrastructures increasingly serving the ends of mass surveillance, commercial profiling—the management of cities, society, even of our own daily desires is being aided more and more by intelligent systems, which are promoted as a measure to safeguard our living standards, security, and efficiency, despite scarcity of resources. But what does this changed digital environment imply for political decision-making processes? And which kinds of alternatives, types of resistance are even still possible in a “smart” world, which constantly learns more about you and your motivations?

 

In the framework of halfway’s discourse on the interdependencies between digital systems and spatial production, along with their impacts on subjectivity concepts, the artist and Open Society Fellow Manu Luksch and curator Marie-France Rafael discussed two of Luksch’s recent works: For the double projection piece Third Quarterly Report (2017) she managed to gain access to one of the biggest players in the field of smart city technologies—Cisco Systems. The rap musical Algo-Rhythm (2019), winner of the Zonta award of the 65th International Short Film Festival Oberhausen, examines how democracy is hollowed out by automated propaganda and microtargeting.

© Manu Luksch, Third Quarterly Report, 2017

Imaginary Display(s) / I call it a museum

Screening and Performance: Marie-France Rafael and Romain Gandolphe

March 29, 2019, halfway

halfway, March 2019

I call it a museum, Romain Gandolphe

On March 29 2019 the art historian/curator Marie-France Rafael addressed her exhibition Imaginary Display(s) – Exhibition as Film / Film as Exhibition, that took place at BNKR Munich in 2018, in a performative dialogue together with the artist Romain Gandolphe. This was the starting point for a discussion on contemporary methods of artistic research and the spatial production of the “exhibition”.

 

Contemporary exhibitions present artistically constructed situations and displays. Thus, we encounter more and more often an art that has adopted the character of a display i.e. of a display situation. The display itself becomes then a work-constituent and perception-processual prerequisite as well as precondition to the artistic process. This is one of Marie-France Rafael main theses in her latest monograph Reisen ins Imaginativ. Künstlerische Displays und Situationen, that led her now to expand her theoretical research into the realization of a performative exhibition: Imaginary Display(s) – Exhibition as Film / Film as Exhibition at BNKR Munich (as part of Stop making sense, it’s as good as it gets.: a 15month long program developed by Ludwig Engel and Joanna Kamm).

 

Marie-France Rafael presented her thoughts and gave an insight into the exhibition that puts on display everything that is usually hidden from the audience: the development process of an exhibition and the production of a film. In a recursive gesture exhibition and film are turned into elements thus creating new situations in time and space. For this she invited the artist Romaine Gandolphe, who already participated in the exhibition in Munich.

 

For his performance I call it a museum, Romain Gandolphe described the topography of an imaginary museum built without any door and from which we can’t exit. He then seeked to think of another way out, inventing new passages through the works and furniture.

User Environments in the Interface City

Map by Benjamin Gerdes and Christian Frieß

In Christian Frieß and Benjamin Gerdes’ folding map titled User Environments in the Interface City a series of patents for the interactive control and efficient flow of subjects forms the starting point for an artistic mapping of smart environments. As a catalog of specific aspects of digital regulations, this map defines a new way of representing the immaterial layers of the city.

Prop-Talk 1

with Roman Seidl and Felix Stalder

December 10, 2018, halfway

The staged discussion situations (Prop-Talk) together with Roman Seidl und Felix Stalder in the halfway building complex on the topic of “Platform Capitalism and Disruptive Technologies” took place in the ground floor conference room with a “Gourmet” vending machine; the next staged situation exploring the focus “Subjectification and Dramatization” was organized in a room of the Alla Lenz hotel; in the halfway project space the topic “Smart Cities und Ubiquitous Computing” was discussed using props.

Archive Boxes 2, 3, 4 – Material Prop-Talk 1

Archive Boxes 2,3,4 presented Prop-Talk 1 with Roman Seidl and Felix Stalder by means of exemplary settings. The staged discussion situations in the halfway building complex on the topic of “Platform Capitalism and Disruptive Technologies” took place in the ground floor conference room with a “Gourmet” vending machine; the next staged situation exploring the focus “Subjectification and Dramatization” was organized in a room of the Alla Lenz hotel; in the halfway project space the topic “Smart Cities und Ubiquitous Computing” was discussed using props.

The Trial of Superdebthunterbot

Film screening and talk with Helen Knowles

January 10, 2019, halfway

© Helen Knowles, The Trial of Superdebthunterbot, 2016

The film The Trial of Superdebthunterbot by Helen Knowles depicts a speculative scenario, which negotiates the topic of the accountability and responsibility of algorithmic processes. Here the word “negotiate” is taken literally and transferred to a courtroom, where an algorithm stands trial for the suicide of several people. The work investigates ways of visualizing the opaque dimensions of an algorithmic culture. Or in other words: How a speculative aesthetic of spatialization can create a stage for negotiating key ethical, legal, and identity politics issues. The film was shot in Southwark Crown Court in London with a cast including two lawyers, the actor Mark Frost, and amateur actors.

You can belong anywhere

Installation in a hotel room

January 9 – 19, 2019, halfway

halfway developed the installation You can belong anywhere in a room of the Alla Lenz hotel, which is also located in the building complex. The project was centered around stagings of identities and spaces following the logic of home sharing platforms, while addressing their effects on urban spaces. The television monitor displayed the video Selling Dreams by Bêka & Lemoine, which takes the mechanisms of profiling and the desire for authenticity to the extreme. The analysis Sharing-Ökonomie des Wohnens – Airbnb in Wien, räumliche und ökonomische Entwicklungslinien (Sharing Economy of Living – Airbnb in Vienna, Spatial and Economic Developments) by Roman J. Seidl, Leonhard Plank, and Justin Kadi presented the impacts of Airbnb on the Viennese housing market.

Spatial Table (Serial Project 1, 2, 3, 4)

The Spatial Table (Serial Project 1,2,3,4) was a tool to communicate halfway’s findings on a series of select typologies of dividual spaces researched in Tokyo: konbini, manga kissa, Spacee, share house, Shibaura House, Tsutaya Bookstore. A city model coordinated with the size of a standard ceiling grid element served as a film set for the (fictional yet commonplace) daily routines of a person who uses these dividual spaces on an everyday basis. Monitors integrated into the model displayed real settings of this fictional everyday. The Spatial Table was a reference to Sol LeWitt’s Serial Project, 1 (ABCD) from 1966, which reflects upon aspects of gridding, seriality, and modularity in the context of the emerging cybernetics discourse. Here the configuration of open and closed cubes was separated from the “protection zone” of artistic autonomy and used as an applied research tool. The Spatial Table was the film set model of a film successively fed with the discussions recorded here with invited guests.

Archive Box 1

Material Spatial Table

In the corresponding Archive Box 1 research material was presented as part of a film script structured along three chapters: Algorithmic City, Evaluated Spaces, Unpublic-Unprivate.

Spatial Table Talk with Ryo Abe

July 25–26, 2018, halfway

On July 25 and 26 talks were held with Tokyo-based architect Ryo Abe in two spatial settings in halfway: the Spatial Table (Serial Project 1, 2, 3, 4) and the Spacee derivative, as one of the representative spatial typologies. The spatial settings serve as exemplary placeholders for concrete places and spaces, while also functioning as displays and surfaces capable of incorporating traces of the discourse and integrating it into its generic construction of spaces.

Spatial Table Talk with Sarah Widmer

October 12, 2018, halfway

On October 12, 2018 the talks around the Spatial Table (Serial Project 1, 2, 3, 4) continued with Swiss researcher Sarah Widmer. The focus of her research concentrates on issues relating to “location-awareness” and “Smartphone assisted mobilities”—for instance, how they are employed in the Foursquare app. In this case, algorithms are programmed so that users with similar profiles are suggested similar places, which triggers the formation of islands of perception and increases certain spatial offers in the urban context at those places frequented by the users. The talks investigated which forms of spatial production emerge in light of an architecture that is coproduced by “filter bubbles”.

Sarah Widmer, halfway, October 2018

Derivatives – Manga Kissa, Spacee

Spatial anchor points were derived from substantive issues in the content. For example, two spatial settings were conceived as quotes or derivatives of dividual spaces, which at the same time served as communication and reference tools.

 

The Spacee Derivative cited a sharing platform for the temporary use of left-over spaces in the city for professional purposes, such as meetings, photo shootings, conferences, etc. Roller blinds created the space and dissolved it once again when it was no longer needed. During events the temporary walls became screens for films, video productions, and lectures.

 

The Manga Kissa Derivative referred to an analog form of the temporary access economy and the dividualization of spaces. For the spatializations it served as a digital archive, accommodating a selection of video works, while it was otherwise designated as a site for individual discussions of the film formats in the project.

Q&A for Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality

Since the beginning of the project chapter-related questions had been sent to numerous actors in various fields of cultural production, which should trigger dialogues above and beyond spatial borders. The responses received on the topic of "Spaces of Dividuality" included texts, graphics, videos and photos. They were mounted to display elements in the halfway space, forming a thematic backdrop for the spatializations.

 

1

What would a space be, which you use, but that belongs to NO ONE? In this space, what would you SHARE with someone?

 

2

HOW do you apportion your life? And WHO shares your life?

 

3

Is there a side of your dividual self that you do NOT want to share with the algorithmic access to your daily media use?

Eszter Steierhoffer

John Cheney-Lippold

Peter Mörtenböck & Helge Mooshammer

Lina Morawetz

Wolfgang Thaler

Marlene Maier

Roemer van Toorn

Edwina Hörl and so/ba

Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality examines urban case studies with prototypical extreme examples of spatial typologies, which are symptomatic of an increasingly “dividual” form of today’s subjectivity. Dividual spaces introduce a fundamental transformation of established spatial concepts. The divided and divisible space corresponds to the “prosumer” subjects and their multiple roles, which always seem to be algorithmically pre-determined from the outset.

Dividuality

Spaces

   of

of

Spaces

Dividuality

Economy

of Architecture

Architecture of Economy

Migration of Forms

Forms of Migration

Dividuality of Spaces / Spaces of Dividuality examines urban case studies with prototypical extreme examples of spatial typologies, which are symptomatic of an increasingly “dividual” form of today’s subjectivity. Dividual spaces introduce a fundamental transformation of established spatial concepts. The divided and divisible space corresponds to the “prosumer” subjects and their multiple roles, which always seem to be algorithmically pre-determined from the outset.

Eszter Steierhoffer

John Cheney-Lippold

Peter Mörtenböck & Helge Mooshammer

Ignacio Valero

Lina Morawetz

Marlene Maier

Roemer van Toorn

Wolfgang Thaler

Edwina Hörl and so/ba