Dividuality

Subjects

   of

of

Subjects

Dividuality

Economy

of Architecture

Architecture of Economy

Migration of Forms

Forms of Migration

Economy of Architecture / Architecture of Economy adressiert die ökonomische Dimension der Raumproduktion, in der unterschiedliche Formen des Spekulativen für eine entscheidende Wende des urbanen Diskurses sorgen. Die algorithmische Kultur dividualer Räume und Subjekte ist längst Bestandteil einer ökonomischen Produktion von räumlichen Blasen, Sonderzonen, Ausnahmezuständen und räumlichen Projektionen in eine Zukunft, von der die Ressourcen geliehen werden.

Urban Subjects: We Hope this Does Not Make Us Sad: Architecture and Design in the Plutocratic Age

Urban Subjects: From a Future Window

We Hope this Does Not Make Us Sad: Architecture and Design in the Plutocratic Age

Exhibition project by Urban Subjects (Sabine Bitter, Jeff Derksen, Helmut Weber) for halfway, June 2019

We have now become used to the fact that, following the financial crisis of 2007-2008, the world’s richest people now hold more than 50% of the world’s wealth. This has lead to speculation of a new moment of plutocracy at the national and global scales. But how have cities, tied into a global-urban nexus of wealth to drive their economic engines, responded to the decade-long rise of a plutocracy? Is the plutocrat, holding the GDP equal to that of a nation, now the scale toward which cities orient themselves?

 

We are looking for ways the ultra-high net worth individuals (UHNW) and the economy associated with them (the plutonomy) has shaped a city that we live in – Vancouver. It could make us sad because we have to look at the lives and spaces of the UHNW and that can be, well, depressing. In fact, the sadness of the super rich themselves has become a point of vital concern, so vital that The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation helped fund a 500-page study of it through The Boston College Center on Wealth and Philanthropy. The research was done before the economic collapse of 2007-2008, and even in that moment of capitalist euphoria there was a deep sadness in the lives of UHNW, those with a net worth of $30 million or more, for they felt isolated from others and insecure. This made us think: How have particular cities become the sites for the super rich? Does it have to do with their sadness as well as supplying a place to ground their wealth through real-estate? But, what other urban qualities and qualities of life might ease this particular sadness – multiculturalism, safety, good restaurants, great food trucks, easy access to nature, excellent money laundering opportunities? We know the ultra-high net worth individuals are sad and worried because they feel isolated, distanced from people and places. That is their sad geography. They are geographically bound and globally networked. While they reterritorialize a city, they unterritorialize themselves – and that is where the sadness starts.  But does that also make a city sad?

From a Future Window

Rhythm-analysis by Urban Subjects

poster-project, realized for SFU Galleries, Vancouver, 2015

adapted for Spatialization I Dividuality of Spaces/Spaces of Dividuality at halfway, Vienna, 2019

Date: 24 May 2043

Time: 10:00 – 16:45

Location: Teck Gallery Window, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Weather: perpetual sun outside, climate control inside

Economy of Architecture / Architecture of Economy adressiert die ökonomische Dimension der Raumproduktion, in der unterschiedliche Formen des Spekulativen für eine entscheidende Wende des urbanen Diskurses sorgen. Die algorithmische Kultur dividualer Räume und Subjekte ist längst Bestandteil einer ökonomischen Produktion von räumlichen Blasen, Sonderzonen, Ausnahmezuständen und räumlichen Projektionen in eine Zukunft, von der die Ressourcen geliehen werden.

We have now become used to the fact that, following the financial crisis of 2007-2008, the world’s richest people now hold more than 50% of the world’s wealth. This has lead to speculation of a new moment of plutocracy at the national and global scales. But how have cities, tied into a global-urban nexus of wealth to drive their economic engines, responded to the decade-long rise of a plutocracy? Is the plutocrat, holding the GDP equal to that of a nation, now the scale toward which cities orient themselves?

 

We are looking for ways the ultra-high net worth individuals (UHNW) and the economy associated with them (the plutonomy) has shaped a city that we live in – Vancouver. It could make us sad because we have to look at the lives and spaces of the UHNW and that can be, well, depressing. In fact, the sadness of the super rich themselves has become a point of vital concern, so vital that The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation helped fund a 500-page study of it through The Boston College Center on Wealth and Philanthropy. The research was done before the economic collapse of 2007-2008, and even in that moment of capitalist euphoria there was a deep sadness in the lives of UHNW, those with a net worth of $30 million or more, for they felt isolated from others and insecure. This made us think: How have particular cities become the sites for the super rich? Does it have to do with their sadness as well as supplying a place to ground their wealth through real-estate? But, what other urban qualities and qualities of life might ease this particular sadness – multiculturalism, safety, good restaurants, great food trucks, easy access to nature, excellent money laundering opportunities? We know the ultra-high net worth individuals are sad and worried because they feel isolated, distanced from people and places. That is their sad geography. They are geographically bound and globally networked. While they reterritorialize a city, they unterritorialize themselves – and that is where the sadness starts.  But does that also make a city sad?

Dividuality

Subjects

   of

of

Subjects

Dividuality

Migration of Forms

Forms of Migration

Economy of Architecture / Architecture of Economy adressiert die ökonomische Dimension der Raumproduktion, in der unterschiedliche Formen des Spekulativen für eine entscheidende Wende des urbanen Diskurses sorgen. Die algorithmische Kultur dividualer Räume und Subjekte ist längst Bestandteil einer ökonomischen Produktion von räumlichen Blasen, Sonderzonen, Ausnahmezuständen und räumlichen Projektionen in eine Zukunft, von der die Ressourcen geliehen werden.

Urban Subjects: We Hope this Does Not Make Us Sad: Architecture and Design in the Plutocratic Age

Urban Subjects: From a Future Window

We Hope this Does Not Make Us Sad: Architecture and Design in the Plutocratic Age

Exhibition project by Urban Subjects (Sabine Bitter, Jeff Derksen, Helmut Weber) for halfway, June 2019

We have now become used to the fact that, following the financial crisis of 2007-2008, the world’s richest people now hold more than 50% of the world’s wealth. This has lead to speculation of a new moment of plutocracy at the national and global scales. But how have cities, tied into a global-urban nexus of wealth to drive their economic engines, responded to the decade-long rise of a plutocracy? Is the plutocrat, holding the GDP equal to that of a nation, now the scale toward which cities orient themselves?

 

We are looking for ways the ultra-high net worth individuals (UHNW) and the economy associated with them (the plutonomy) has shaped a city that we live in – Vancouver. It could make us sad because we have to look at the lives and spaces of the UHNW and that can be, well, depressing. In fact, the sadness of the super rich themselves has become a point of vital concern, so vital that The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation helped fund a 500-page study of it through The Boston College Center on Wealth and Philanthropy. The research was done before the economic collapse of 2007-2008, and even in that moment of capitalist euphoria there was a deep sadness in the lives of UHNW, those with a net worth of $30 million or more, for they felt isolated from others and insecure. This made us think: How have particular cities become the sites for the super rich? Does it have to do with their sadness as well as supplying a place to ground their wealth through real-estate? But, what other urban qualities and qualities of life might ease this particular sadness – multiculturalism, safety, good restaurants, great food trucks, easy access to nature, excellent money laundering opportunities? We know the ultra-high net worth individuals are sad and worried because they feel isolated, distanced from people and places. That is their sad geography. They are geographically bound and globally networked. While they reterritorialize a city, they unterritorialize themselves – and that is where the sadness starts.  But does that also make a city sad?

From a Future Window

Rhythm-analysis by Urban Subjects

poster-project, realized for SFU Galleries, Vancouver, 2015

adapted for Spatialization I Dividuality of Spaces/Spaces of Dividuality at halfway, Vienna, 2019

Date: 24 May 2043

Time: 10:00 – 16:45

Location: Teck Gallery Window, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Weather: perpetual sun outside, climate control inside